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    5 questions with Gray Cook; Part 2: Do You Favor a Specific Style of KB Swing? | Community Post

    5 questions with Gray Cook; Part 2: Do You Favor a Specific Style of KB Swing? | Community Post

    12/23/2014

    Today we bring you part 2 of 5 of our ongoing conversation with Gray Cook. If you missed the part 1, check here. In our practice, we regularly see athletes performing swings overhead without the requisite thoracic and shoulder capacities to be able to maintain positions of high integrity. What we normally see are internally rotated shoulders, bent elbows, overextended lumbar, and forward head on neck tensioning compensation. Yes, you can swing this way (I personally think the overhead swing tells us a TON of information about an athlete both when they are fresh and when they get tired….) but…

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    From Pathology to Function in the Shoulder Part 3 | Pro Episode #83

    From Pathology to Function in the Shoulder Part 3 | Pro Episode #83

    10/31/2014

    In the last two pro-episodes, we’ve covered the need to optimize start and finish positioning as a baseline to creating normal function. Well you ask, “what about the middle?” As it turns out, the principles governing physiology also govern technique. Technique in fact, is the expression of physiology to solve a movement task. Usually, we see the bulk of coaching cues fall into organizing the spine, or creating rotation (like arm pit facing forward, or breaking the bar). When athletes are missing key ranges of motion, are stiff in the prime movers, or aren’t aware that they need to buffer…

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    Spinal Hierarchy Primer: The Language and Best Function of Your Spine – Pro Episode #79

    Spinal Hierarchy Primer: The Language and Best Function of Your Spine – Pro Episode #79

    09/22/2014

    Like the archetypal positions of your shoulders and hips, there also exists a “root movement language” for your spine. The function of your spine can be thought of in terms of the “best” shape for a given task. For example it’s hard to perform a back flip or smash a volley ball at the net with the same spinal position you use dead lift or squat. Or, creating rotation in a golf swing will be a disaster if it’s performed with the spinal shapes typically associated with shouldering a stone (or texting on your iphone.) When we instruct beginners, or…